Coca-Cola invests R25 million towards hyacinth removal

 

Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa’s (CCBSA) is investing R25m in a company that turns water hyacinth into commercial products such as fertiliser and animal feed and work at the Hartbeespoort Dam has already started.

“By harvesting the plant and turning it into organic fertiliser, we complete the cycle of turning the pollutants into nutrients which then feed plants or animals. Thus integrating the cycle back into economic ecosystems which benefit the economy at large,” said John Kondowe, executive director of Hya Matla Organics

The Mintirho Foundation is Coca-Cola’s vehicle for supporting the development of historically disadvantaged emerging farmers and small suppliers of inputs into the CCBSA value chain. The foundation’s executive manager Noxolo Kahlana said Hya Matla Organics caught the foundation’s eye because its business model is to remove waste from catchment areas and preserve water.

“Water is something on which our business is totally dependent, and in a water-scarce country like ours, we have a responsibility as industry to help where we can to conserve water. Therefore, supporting initiatives aimed at cleaning our water catchment areas is critical, and something that CCBSA is committed to advancing,” Kahlana said.

Rudy Joles, CEO of the Harties Foundation NPC, that has been continually fighting the hyacinth invasion and pollution on the Hartbeespoort Dam for the past two years, said the foundation welcomes Hya Matla’s assistance in removing the invasive water plant.

“We congratulate Hya Matla on their funding and future endeavours, and have already engaged with them to join our long term holistic approach, supported by the estates around the dam and donors at large,” Joles said.

“As a town we stopped an ecological disaster when action was taken in 2017 leading to the current result of less than 15% hyacinths coverage on the dam. Harties Foundation has a five-year-plan which does not only consist of hyacinth removal, it also involves overseeing quality of water, installing and maintaining litter-traps and floating wetlands as well as promoting ecological control. This will make a tangible and sustainable difference in the long term while also creating jobs and opportunities for the local community.”

https://kormorant.co.za/49820/coca-cola-invests-r25-million-towards-hyacinth-removal/

2 thoughts on “Coca-Cola invests R25 million towards hyacinth removal

  • May 9, 2019 at 8:39 am
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    The Hartbeespoort community has come together in an effort to clean up the famous Hartebeespoort Dam.

    Over the years it’s been plagued by the growth of hyacinth – the most invasive and rapidly proliferating aquatic weed in the world.

    To date, hundreds of hyacinth have been removed successfully through the Harties Foundation.

    Azania Mosaka spoke to founding director Rudy Joles and Petrus Venter, North West Deputy Regional Director for Integrated Water Resource Management at the Department of Sanitation.

    We have gone over and asked the town as a collective to help with public funding. R 1.7 million has been raised, at this stage we are still about R 600 000 in the red.

    — Rudy Joles, founding director of the Harties Foundation
    The good part is we have reduced the 45% coverage down to less than 7%.

    — Rudy Joles, founding director of the Harties Foundation
    We never going to get rid of hyacinth and the project plan in place is that we need to contain 3 to 5% hyacinth on the dam continuously. The hyacinth contribute to the quality of the water.

    — Rudy Joles, founding director of the Harties Foundation

  • May 9, 2019 at 8:48 am
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    Coca-Cola has invested R25 million in Hya Matla Organics – a startup which turns water hyacinth into commercial products like fertiliser and animal feed.

    The investment was made through the Mintirho Foundation, which is owned by Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa.

    Water hyacinth, known as the world’s worst water weed, is an invasive plant that grows in polluted water and further compromises water quality.

    Hya Matla Organics executive director John Kondowe said by harvesting hyacinth and turning it into organic fertilizer, they “complete the cycle of turning the pollutants into nutrients”.

    The project is currently being implemented in Hartbeespoort Dam near Pretoria, one of the most severely-affected by water hyacinth growth.

    Mintirho Foundation executive manager Noxolo Kahlana said Hya Matla Organics’s business model to remove waste from catchment areas and preserve water caught their eye.

    “Supporting initiatives aimed at cleaning our water catchment areas are critical, and something that we are committed to advancing,” Kahlana said.

    Turning water hyacinth into commercial products
    Hya Matla Organics has developed the technology which enables the production of organic fertilizers from the invasive water hyacinth plants at industrial scale.

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